surethings

theantidote:

Streetcorner, Khajuraho (by Marji Lang)
Silhouette of a little girl running in a colourful street of Madhya Pradesh, India.

theantidote:

Streetcorner, Khajuraho (by Marji Lang)

Silhouette of a little girl running in a colourful street of Madhya Pradesh, India.

lolidollyhaze:

Joseph Cornell, Nymphlight (1957)

(via bbook)

“Creating a life that reflects your values and satisfies your soul is a rare achievement. In a culture that relentlessly promotes avarice and excess as the good life, a person happy doing his own work is usually considered an eccentric, if not a subversive. Ambition is only understood if it’s to rise to the top of some imaginary ladder of success. Someone who takes an undemanding job because it affords him the time to pursue other interests and activities is considered a flake. A person who abandons a career in order to stay home and raise children is considered not to be living up to his potential — as if a job title and salary are the sole measure of human worth.You’ll be told in a hundred ways, some subtle and some not, to keep climbing, and never be satisfied with where you are, who you are, and what you’re doing. There are a million ways to sell yourself out, and I guarantee you’ll hear about them.To invent your own life’s meaning is not easy, but it’s still allowed, and I think you’ll be happier for the trouble.”

—   Bill Watterson (via alesthetique)

(Source: sololoquy, via alesthetique)

“I live my life, you live yours. If you’re clear about what you want, then you can live any way you please. I don’t give a damn what people say. They can be reptile food for all I care.”

—   Haruki Murakami - Dance Dance Dance (via murakamistuff)

(via murakamistuff)

theantidote:

Paul W Ruiz
oil on linen

theantidote:

Paul W Ruiz

oil on linen

nprbooks:

Photos: Aubrey Dunnuck

Venice’s Libreria Acqua Alta stores books in gondolas, canoes and bathtubs to protect them from rising canal waters.

They’ve also got a pretty sweet fire exit.

via Smithsonian Magazine (smithsonianmag)

(via npr)

“Go and get a job. Go and find a flat. Find somebody else. Put them in the flat. Make them stay. Get a toaster. Go to work. Get on the bus. Look at your boss. Say, “fuck”. Sit down. Pick up the thing. Go blank. Scream internally. Go home. Listen to the radio. Look at the other person. Think, “WHY? Why did this happen?”. Go to bed. Lie awake! At night! Get up. Feel groggy. Put the things on - your clothes - whatever they’re called. Go out the door, into work - same thing! Same people, again, it’s real, it is happening, to you. Go home again! Sit, Radio, Dinner - mmm, GARDENING, GARDENING, GARDENING, death!”

—   Dylan Moran (via alesthetique)

(Source: i-live-alone-in-a-tree, via alesthetique)

elizabitchtaylor:

Sue Lyon photographed by Paul Slade, 1962

(via paris-is-far-away-from-me)

loverofbeauty:

Sammy Davis jr. Selfie (1960s)

loverofbeauty:

Sammy Davis jr. Selfie (1960s)

(Source: oneinchlunch, via paris-is-far-away-from-me)

vivipiuomeno:

Rimantas Dichavicius ph.  

vivipiuomeno:

Rimantas Dichavicius ph.  

(via paris-is-far-away-from-me)

liisakaarsoo:

dogma-art:

Artist Yayoi Kusama in her studio in the psychiatric hospital in Tokyo and back in the days in her New York studio.

Having suffered nervous disorders and hallucinations since childhood, Kusama has chosen to live in a Tokyo psychiatric hospital for the past 38 years, and has built herself a studio opposite. Health permitting, she still makes a daily journey from the hospital to her studio to paint. 

excerpts from Kusama: Princess of Polka Dots directed by Heather Lenz

http://bit.ly/1f48Y8V

i fucking love kusama

(via lalaladylove)

“Anyone can fight the battles of just one day. It is only when you and I add the battles of those two awful eternities, yesterday and tomorrow, that we break down. It is not the experience of today that drives us mad. It is the remorse or bitterness for something that happened yesterday or the dread of what tomorrow may bring. Let us therefore do our best to live but one day at a time.”

—   Richard Walker in Twenty-Four Hours A Day. Taken from writer, Austin Kleon's wonderful post: “Something Small, Every Day.” (via crashinglybeautiful)