surethings

Two-Lane Blacktop (1971)

brightwalldarkroom:

AN AMERICAN ACHE

by Alexander Newton

My father can fix your plumbing or your grammar, restore an old radio or build a table and put a nice finish on it. Back in the 1970s he installed solar panels on our roof and devised the system that heated our water. One summer, my brother and I…

(Source: brightwalldarkroom)

gregorychatman:

“Art has to be a kind of confession. I don’t mean a true confession in the sense of that dreary magazine. The effort it seems to me, is: if you can examine and face your life, you can discover the terms with which you are connected to other lives, and they can discover them, too — the terms with which they are connected to other people. This has happened to every one of us, I’m sure. You read something which you thought only happened to you, and you discovered it happened 100 years ago to Dostoyevsky. This is a very great liberation for the suffering, struggling person, who always thinks that they are alone. This is why art is important. Art would not be important if life were not important, and life is important. Most of us, no matter what we say, are walking in the dark, whistling in the dark. Nobody knows what is going to happen to them from one moment to the next, or how one will bear it. This is irreducible. And it’s true for everybody. Now, it is true that the nature of society is to create, among its citizens, an illusion of safety; but it is also absolutely true that the safety is always necessarily an illusion. Artists are here to disturb the peace. They have to disturb the peace. Otherwise, chaos.”
— James Baldwin in an interview in 1961 (via dorkdweeb)

gregorychatman:

Art has to be a kind of confession. I don’t mean a true confession in the sense of that dreary magazine. The effort it seems to me, is: if you can examine and face your life, you can discover the terms with which you are connected to other lives, and they can discover them, too — the terms with which they are connected to other people. This has happened to every one of us, I’m sure. You read something which you thought only happened to you, and you discovered it happened 100 years ago to Dostoyevsky. This is a very great liberation for the suffering, struggling person, who always thinks that they are alone. This is why art is important. Art would not be important if life were not important, and life is important. Most of us, no matter what we say, are walking in the dark, whistling in the dark. Nobody knows what is going to happen to them from one moment to the next, or how one will bear it. This is irreducible. And it’s true for everybody. Now, it is true that the nature of society is to create, among its citizens, an illusion of safety; but it is also absolutely true that the safety is always necessarily an illusion. Artists are here to disturb the peace. They have to disturb the peace. Otherwise, chaos.
— James Baldwin in an interview in 1961 (via dorkdweeb)

(via lalaladylove)

sisterwolf:

Bedouin Bride, Israel, 1964 -  Wolfgang Sutchitzky

sisterwolf:

Bedouin Bride, Israel, 1964 -  Wolfgang Sutchitzky

(via bohemiadesign)

piekna-epoka:

Andrzej Wróblewski - Autoportret z żoną, maj 1954

(Source: andrzejwroblewski.pl, via paris-is-far-away-from-me)

wonderfulambiguity:

Robert Doisneau, Mademoiselle Anita à la Boule Rouge, rue de Lappe, Paris, 1951

wonderfulambiguity:

Robert Doisneau, Mademoiselle Anita à la Boule Rouge, rue de Lappe, Paris, 1951

(via paris-is-far-away-from-me)

diepunkte:

Ruth Bernhard. At the Pool (via (4) Facebook)

diepunkte:

Ruth Bernhard. At the Pool (via (4) Facebook)

“You were not there for the beginning. You will not be there for the end. Your knowledge of what is going on can only be superficial and relative.”

—   

William Burroughs, Naked Lunch

(via gotwilk)

(via theantidote)

theantidote:

Jazz (by paolobarzman)
callascala:

Maria Callas

Cassavetes on Cassavetes
theantidote:

Henri Cartier-Bresson with Leica M3, 1964 by Ara Güler  [+]
“A portrait is not simply the picture of a face,” says Ara Güler, one of Turkey’s most renowned photographers, “it is the entirety of a life.” 86 years old today, Güler remembers Henri Cartier-Bresson: “He was like a big brother to me. He was 20 years older than me and taught me a lot. For me, he’s the greatest.” Through Cartier-Bresson, the doyen of the “decisive moment” and co-founder of Magnum, Güler joined the legendary agency in the early 1960s. Using perspectives reminiscent of his French role model, the “Eye of Istanbul” portrayed not only 20th-century artists, writers and thinkers, but also his native city as it was undergoing transformation: “Our work on Paris and Istanbul was similar in some ways: we both seized the moment when a world was disappearing – a world of artisans giving way to a world of mechanics.” Voted “Master of Leica” in 1962, Güler took this photograph of his friend – as unexceptional as it is symbolic – two years later, using a M3 Chrome: “This portrait speaks volumes. I took it unexpectedly, just when his eye was distracted by a subject he was interested in shooting himself.  The camera – a Leica of course – is at hand, ready for use.”
Ref. : Ara Güler, Creating the 20th Century, 100 Artists, Writers and Thinkers, Singapore 2011, p. 59
quote and photo from westlicht
(via chagalov:)

theantidote:

Henri Cartier-Bresson with Leica M3, 1964 by Ara Güler  [+]

“A portrait is not simply the picture of a face,” says Ara Güler, one of Turkey’s most renowned photographers, “it is the entirety of a life.” 86 years old today, Güler remembers Henri Cartier-Bresson: “He was like a big brother to me. He was 20 years older than me and taught me a lot. For me, he’s the greatest.” Through Cartier-Bresson, the doyen of the “decisive moment” and co-founder of Magnum, Güler joined the legendary agency in the early 1960s. Using perspectives reminiscent of his French role model, the “Eye of Istanbul” portrayed not only 20th-century artists, writers and thinkers, but also his native city as it was undergoing transformation: “Our work on Paris and Istanbul was similar in some ways: we both seized the moment when a world was disappearing – a world of artisans giving way to a world of mechanics.” Voted “Master of Leica” in 1962, Güler took this photograph of his friend – as unexceptional as it is symbolic – two years later, using a M3 Chrome: “This portrait speaks volumes. I took it unexpectedly, just when his eye was distracted by a subject he was interested in shooting himself.  The camera – a Leica of course – is at hand, ready for use.”

Ref. : Ara Güler, Creating the 20th Century, 100 Artists, Writers and Thinkers, Singapore 2011, p. 59

quote and photo from westlicht

(via chagalov:)

heavenhillgirl:

La collectionneuse (1967), dir. Eric Rohmer

heavenhillgirl:

La collectionneuse (1967), dir. Eric Rohmer

(via bbook)

theantidote:

Streetcorner, Khajuraho (by Marji Lang)
Silhouette of a little girl running in a colourful street of Madhya Pradesh, India.

theantidote:

Streetcorner, Khajuraho (by Marji Lang)

Silhouette of a little girl running in a colourful street of Madhya Pradesh, India.

lolidollyhaze:

Joseph Cornell, Nymphlight (1957)

(via bbook)