surethings


Cassavetes on Cassavetes
theantidote:

Henri Cartier-Bresson with Leica M3, 1964 by Ara Güler  [+]
“A portrait is not simply the picture of a face,” says Ara Güler, one of Turkey’s most renowned photographers, “it is the entirety of a life.” 86 years old today, Güler remembers Henri Cartier-Bresson: “He was like a big brother to me. He was 20 years older than me and taught me a lot. For me, he’s the greatest.” Through Cartier-Bresson, the doyen of the “decisive moment” and co-founder of Magnum, Güler joined the legendary agency in the early 1960s. Using perspectives reminiscent of his French role model, the “Eye of Istanbul” portrayed not only 20th-century artists, writers and thinkers, but also his native city as it was undergoing transformation: “Our work on Paris and Istanbul was similar in some ways: we both seized the moment when a world was disappearing – a world of artisans giving way to a world of mechanics.” Voted “Master of Leica” in 1962, Güler took this photograph of his friend – as unexceptional as it is symbolic – two years later, using a M3 Chrome: “This portrait speaks volumes. I took it unexpectedly, just when his eye was distracted by a subject he was interested in shooting himself.  The camera – a Leica of course – is at hand, ready for use.”
Ref. : Ara Güler, Creating the 20th Century, 100 Artists, Writers and Thinkers, Singapore 2011, p. 59
quote and photo from westlicht
(via chagalov:)

theantidote:

Henri Cartier-Bresson with Leica M3, 1964 by Ara Güler  [+]

“A portrait is not simply the picture of a face,” says Ara Güler, one of Turkey’s most renowned photographers, “it is the entirety of a life.” 86 years old today, Güler remembers Henri Cartier-Bresson: “He was like a big brother to me. He was 20 years older than me and taught me a lot. For me, he’s the greatest.” Through Cartier-Bresson, the doyen of the “decisive moment” and co-founder of Magnum, Güler joined the legendary agency in the early 1960s. Using perspectives reminiscent of his French role model, the “Eye of Istanbul” portrayed not only 20th-century artists, writers and thinkers, but also his native city as it was undergoing transformation: “Our work on Paris and Istanbul was similar in some ways: we both seized the moment when a world was disappearing – a world of artisans giving way to a world of mechanics.” Voted “Master of Leica” in 1962, Güler took this photograph of his friend – as unexceptional as it is symbolic – two years later, using a M3 Chrome: “This portrait speaks volumes. I took it unexpectedly, just when his eye was distracted by a subject he was interested in shooting himself.  The camera – a Leica of course – is at hand, ready for use.”

Ref. : Ara Güler, Creating the 20th Century, 100 Artists, Writers and Thinkers, Singapore 2011, p. 59

quote and photo from westlicht

(via chagalov:)

heavenhillgirl:

La collectionneuse (1967), dir. Eric Rohmer

heavenhillgirl:

La collectionneuse (1967), dir. Eric Rohmer

(via bbook)

theantidote:

Streetcorner, Khajuraho (by Marji Lang)
Silhouette of a little girl running in a colourful street of Madhya Pradesh, India.

theantidote:

Streetcorner, Khajuraho (by Marji Lang)

Silhouette of a little girl running in a colourful street of Madhya Pradesh, India.

lolidollyhaze:

Joseph Cornell, Nymphlight (1957)

(via bbook)

“Creating a life that reflects your values and satisfies your soul is a rare achievement. In a culture that relentlessly promotes avarice and excess as the good life, a person happy doing his own work is usually considered an eccentric, if not a subversive. Ambition is only understood if it’s to rise to the top of some imaginary ladder of success. Someone who takes an undemanding job because it affords him the time to pursue other interests and activities is considered a flake. A person who abandons a career in order to stay home and raise children is considered not to be living up to his potential — as if a job title and salary are the sole measure of human worth.You’ll be told in a hundred ways, some subtle and some not, to keep climbing, and never be satisfied with where you are, who you are, and what you’re doing. There are a million ways to sell yourself out, and I guarantee you’ll hear about them.To invent your own life’s meaning is not easy, but it’s still allowed, and I think you’ll be happier for the trouble.”

—   Bill Watterson (via alesthetique)

(Source: sololoquy, via alesthetique)

“I live my life, you live yours. If you’re clear about what you want, then you can live any way you please. I don’t give a damn what people say. They can be reptile food for all I care.”

—   Haruki Murakami - Dance Dance Dance (via murakamistuff)

(via murakamistuff)

theantidote:

Paul W Ruiz
oil on linen

theantidote:

Paul W Ruiz

oil on linen

nprbooks:

Photos: Aubrey Dunnuck

Venice’s Libreria Acqua Alta stores books in gondolas, canoes and bathtubs to protect them from rising canal waters.

They’ve also got a pretty sweet fire exit.

via Smithsonian Magazine (smithsonianmag)

(via npr)

“Go and get a job. Go and find a flat. Find somebody else. Put them in the flat. Make them stay. Get a toaster. Go to work. Get on the bus. Look at your boss. Say, “fuck”. Sit down. Pick up the thing. Go blank. Scream internally. Go home. Listen to the radio. Look at the other person. Think, “WHY? Why did this happen?”. Go to bed. Lie awake! At night! Get up. Feel groggy. Put the things on - your clothes - whatever they’re called. Go out the door, into work - same thing! Same people, again, it’s real, it is happening, to you. Go home again! Sit, Radio, Dinner - mmm, GARDENING, GARDENING, GARDENING, death!”

—   Dylan Moran (via alesthetique)

(Source: i-live-alone-in-a-tree, via alesthetique)

elizabitchtaylor:

Sue Lyon photographed by Paul Slade, 1962

(via paris-is-far-away-from-me)