surethings

sogorgeous81:

Vogue, april 1962

sogorgeous81:

Vogue, april 1962

(via paris-is-far-away-from-me)

We had a lot of trouble with western mental health workers who came here immediately after the genocide and we had to ask some of them to leave.

They came and their practice did not involve being outside in the sun where you begin to feel better. There was no music or drumming to get your blood flowing again. There was no sense that everyone had taken the day off so that the entire community could come together to try to lift you up and bring you back to joy. There was no acknowledgement of the depression as something invasive and external that could actually be cast out again.

Instead they would take people one at a time into these dingy little rooms and have them sit around for an hour or so and talk about bad things that had happened to them. We had to ask them to leave.

—   ~A Rwandan talking to a western writer, Andrew Solomon, about his experience with western mental health and depression.

From The Moth podcast, ‘Notes on an Exorcism’. (via jacobwren)

(Source: facebook.com, via lalaladylove)

“I was always attracted not by some quantifiable, external beauty, but by something deep down, something absolute. Just as some people have a secret love for rainstorms, earthquakes, or blackouts, I liked that certain undefinable something.”

—   

Haruki Murakami, South of the Border, West of the Sun

(via wordsnquotes)

(Source: wordsnquotes, via theantidote)

“Whatever it was I lost, whatever I wept for
Was a wild, gentle thing, the small dark eyes
Loving me in secret.”

—   James Wright, from “Milkweed,” Collected Poems (Wesleyan University Press, 1971)

(Source: apoetreflects, via theantidote)

“Learn the alchemy true human beings know. The moment you accept what troubles you’ve been given the door with open.”

—   

Rumi

(via thecalminside)

(via theantidote)

federer7:

Monica Vitti  often carried a cat in her arms while shooting the film “High Infidelit” 
Everett Collection

federer7:

Monica Vitti  often carried a cat in her arms while shooting the film “High Infidelit”

Everett Collection

(Source: pleasurephotoroom.wordpress.com, via paris-is-far-away-from-me)

myimaginarybrooklyn:

{Yes.}

“Any given moment―no matter how casual, how ordinary―is poised, full of gaping life.”

—   Anne Michaels, Fugitive Pieces (via splitterherzen)

A great fucking book, btw.

(via lalaladylove)

federer7:

Bruges, procession du St Sang : l’étable de Bethléem
Agence Meurisse

federer7:

Bruges, procession du St Sang : l’étable de Bethléem

Agence Meurisse

(via paris-is-far-away-from-me)


Yoko from Winter Journey by Nobuyoshi Araki, 1991Also
Yoko from Winter Journey by Nobuyoshi Araki, 1991

Also

(via paris-is-far-away-from-me)

Two-Lane Blacktop (1971)

brightwalldarkroom:

AN AMERICAN ACHE

by Alexander Newton

My father can fix your plumbing or your grammar, restore an old radio or build a table and put a nice finish on it. Back in the 1970s he installed solar panels on our roof and devised the system that heated our water. One summer, my brother and I…

(Source: brightwalldarkroom)

gregorychatman:

“Art has to be a kind of confession. I don’t mean a true confession in the sense of that dreary magazine. The effort it seems to me, is: if you can examine and face your life, you can discover the terms with which you are connected to other lives, and they can discover them, too — the terms with which they are connected to other people. This has happened to every one of us, I’m sure. You read something which you thought only happened to you, and you discovered it happened 100 years ago to Dostoyevsky. This is a very great liberation for the suffering, struggling person, who always thinks that they are alone. This is why art is important. Art would not be important if life were not important, and life is important. Most of us, no matter what we say, are walking in the dark, whistling in the dark. Nobody knows what is going to happen to them from one moment to the next, or how one will bear it. This is irreducible. And it’s true for everybody. Now, it is true that the nature of society is to create, among its citizens, an illusion of safety; but it is also absolutely true that the safety is always necessarily an illusion. Artists are here to disturb the peace. They have to disturb the peace. Otherwise, chaos.”
— James Baldwin in an interview in 1961 (via dorkdweeb)

gregorychatman:

Art has to be a kind of confession. I don’t mean a true confession in the sense of that dreary magazine. The effort it seems to me, is: if you can examine and face your life, you can discover the terms with which you are connected to other lives, and they can discover them, too — the terms with which they are connected to other people. This has happened to every one of us, I’m sure. You read something which you thought only happened to you, and you discovered it happened 100 years ago to Dostoyevsky. This is a very great liberation for the suffering, struggling person, who always thinks that they are alone. This is why art is important. Art would not be important if life were not important, and life is important. Most of us, no matter what we say, are walking in the dark, whistling in the dark. Nobody knows what is going to happen to them from one moment to the next, or how one will bear it. This is irreducible. And it’s true for everybody. Now, it is true that the nature of society is to create, among its citizens, an illusion of safety; but it is also absolutely true that the safety is always necessarily an illusion. Artists are here to disturb the peace. They have to disturb the peace. Otherwise, chaos.
— James Baldwin in an interview in 1961 (via dorkdweeb)

(via lalaladylove)

sisterwolf:

Bedouin Bride, Israel, 1964 -  Wolfgang Sutchitzky

sisterwolf:

Bedouin Bride, Israel, 1964 -  Wolfgang Sutchitzky

(via bohemiadesign)

piekna-epoka:

Andrzej Wróblewski - Autoportret z żoną, maj 1954

(Source: andrzejwroblewski.pl, via paris-is-far-away-from-me)

wonderfulambiguity:

Robert Doisneau, Mademoiselle Anita à la Boule Rouge, rue de Lappe, Paris, 1951

wonderfulambiguity:

Robert Doisneau, Mademoiselle Anita à la Boule Rouge, rue de Lappe, Paris, 1951

(via paris-is-far-away-from-me)